Anti-Black Racism Town Hall

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Anti-Black Racism Town Hall


Thursday, August 6 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Durham Region residents are invited to ask questions, listen in, and share stories/ideas about how the Region can address systemic anti-Black racism in our community.

Durham Regional Chair John Henry has invited Durham Regional Police Chief Paul Martin to join in the discussion, along with the following Durham residents:

  • Sean Mauricette, Award-winning Motivational Speaker, Artist and Youth Worker (Moderator)
  • Celina Caesar-Chavannes, Consultant and Former Member of Parliament
  • David Mitchell, Assistant Deputy Minister, Youth Justice Division of the Ontario Ministry of Children, Community and Social Services
  • Ann Marie Morrison, incoming President for the Black Student Success Network, Durham College

How to participate

To pre-register to participate, follow this link. You can also stream the event online.

No form of racism is acceptable. Yet, we know that peoplecontinue to experience unfair treatment because of the colour of their skin or their cultural background—some more frequently than others.

Your voice is important

Your advice will allow us to better understand the scope of the situation here in Durham Region; and how Regional programs and policies can help address systemic anti-Black racism in our community. You may also choose to share your story below.


Thursday, August 6 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Durham Region residents are invited to ask questions, listen in, and share stories/ideas about how the Region can address systemic anti-Black racism in our community.

Durham Regional Chair John Henry has invited Durham Regional Police Chief Paul Martin to join in the discussion, along with the following Durham residents:

  • Sean Mauricette, Award-winning Motivational Speaker, Artist and Youth Worker (Moderator)
  • Celina Caesar-Chavannes, Consultant and Former Member of Parliament
  • David Mitchell, Assistant Deputy Minister, Youth Justice Division of the Ontario Ministry of Children, Community and Social Services
  • Ann Marie Morrison, incoming President for the Black Student Success Network, Durham College

How to participate

To pre-register to participate, follow this link. You can also stream the event online.

No form of racism is acceptable. Yet, we know that peoplecontinue to experience unfair treatment because of the colour of their skin or their cultural background—some more frequently than others.

Your voice is important

Your advice will allow us to better understand the scope of the situation here in Durham Region; and how Regional programs and policies can help address systemic anti-Black racism in our community. You may also choose to share your story below.

Share your experience

If you feel comfortable doing so, please share your stories of experiencing anti-Black racism in Durham Region. This will allow us to better understand the scope of the situation here in Durham Region; understanding how Regional programs and policies can help address systemic anti-Black racism in our community. We are listening.

If you would prefer to share your story by email, please send it to DurhamStrong@durham.ca.

Thank you for sharing your story with us.

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    Racism exists in schools

    by Hemanshu, about 12 hours ago

    Our 5 year son who is now 14 was called dark brown in his elementary school in Whitby. This is sooo wrong on sooo many levels how can kids that age distinguish each other by the colour of their skin. Even if it was done innocently it's something the child learned somewhere and most likely at home.

    Our son has all types of friends from different heritages and he is not the one to distinguish based on the colour of one's skin. He understands that we are all human even though we might look different.

    I have been called names... Continue reading